Osteoporosis

Our bones are living tissue that give our body structure, allow us to move and protect our organs. Osteoporosis is a condition where bones become thin and  lose their strength. This can lead to fractures, which cause pain and make everyday activities extremely difficult. After a hip fracture, about one-quarter of people die or never walk again. 

It’s estimated over 200 million women have osteoporosis. That’s more than the combined populations of the Germany, the United Kingdom and France.

Worldwide, one in three women and one in five men over the age of fifty will experience an osteoporotic fracture.

In fact, every three seconds a bone will break, somewhere in the world, because of this disease.

Many people won’t know they have osteoporosis until their first fracture, which is why it’s called the ‘silent disease’. Even after a break, it often goes untreated.

The good news is osteoporosis can be diagnosed and treated and fractures often prevented through healthy lifestyle choices and appropriate medication for those in need.
 

Our Bone Health Advocates

René Rizzoli, IOF Treasurer and CSA Vice-Chair

IOF's scientific members carry out a broad range of research projects, participate in educational programs and provide valuable support to the patient movement.

Susan Hampshire, U.K. theatre, film and television actress, patron of the National Osteoporosis Society (NOS) in the U.K. speaking at the IOF Women Leaders Roundtable, October 2008

Your bones are for life. Look after them and they will carry you far.

Hal and Chris Stokes, Jamaica Bobsled Team

There are some things we don't take risks with, like our bone health. Without strong bones, we would not have been able to ride a bobsled for a country without winter. So, take the IOF Osteoporosis Risk Test, it is only one minute. Beat the Break so you too can follow your dreams.